r.i.p. excellent horselike lady

reblogged: (via)
15,238 notes
April 18, 2014
flyartproductions:

The persistence of Ms. Jackson
The Persistence of Memory (1931), Salvador Dali / Ms. Jackson, Outkast

flyartproductions:

The persistence of Ms. Jackson

The Persistence of Memory (1931), Salvador Dali / Ms. Jackson, Outkast

 
reblogged: (via)
609 notes
April 18, 2014
blurrypicturesofmikewazowski:

this picture is iconic 

blurrypicturesofmikewazowski:

this picture is iconic 

 
reblogged: (via)
4,648 notes
April 18, 2014

(Source: hotelmario)

 
reblogged: (via)
209 notes
April 18, 2014
richardreedparty:

oh my god

richardreedparty:

oh my god

 
reblogged: (via)
80 notes
April 13, 2014

(Source: riffinbits)

 
reblogged: (via)
63,060 notes
April 13, 2014

(Source: hylianears)

 
reblogged: (via)
107,327 notes
April 13, 2014
i-peed-so-hard-i-laughed:

Robyn needs to calm the fuck down

i-peed-so-hard-i-laughed:

Robyn needs to calm the fuck down

 
reblogged: (via)
151,637 notes
April 12, 2014

(Source: gaypee)

 
reblogged: (via)
28,291 notes
April 12, 2014
hannibalhamlin:

The only book I will ever need

hannibalhamlin:

The only book I will ever need

 
reblogged: (via)
10,693 notes
April 12, 2014

(Source: cindymayweather)

 
reblogged: (via)
48,128 notes
April 12, 2014

When [an abusive man] tells me that he became abusive because he lost control of himself, I ask him why he didn’t do something even worse. For example, I might say, “You called her a fucking whore, you grabbed the phone out of her hand and whipped it across the room, and then you gave her a shove and she fell down. There she was at your feet where it would have been easy to kick her in the head. Now, you have just finished telling me that you were ‘totally out of control’ at that time, but you didn’t kick her. What stopped you?” And the client can always give me a reason. Here are some common explanations:

"I wouldn’t want to cause her a serious injury."
“I realized one of the children was watching.”
“I was afraid someone would call the police.”
“I could kill her if I did that.”
“The fight was getting loud, and I was afraid the neighbors would hear.”

And the most frequent response of all:

"Jesus, I wouldn’t do that. I would never do something like that to her.”

The response that I almost never heard — I remember hearing it twice in the fifteen years — was: “I don’t know.”

These ready answers strip the cover off of my clients’ loss of control excuse. While a man is on an abusive rampage, verbally or physically, his mind maintains awareness of a number of questions: “Am I doing something that other people could find out about, so it could make me look bad? Am I doing anything that could get me in legal trouble? Could I get hurt myself? Am I doing anything that I myself consider too cruel, gross, or violent?”

A critical insight seeped into me from working with my first few dozen clients: An abuser almost never does anything that he himself considers morally unacceptable. He may hide what he does because he thinks other people would disagree with it, but he feels justified inside. I can’t remember a client ever having said to me: “There’s no way I can defend what I did. It was just totally wrong.” He invariably has a reason that he considers good enough. In short, an abuser’s core problem is that he has a distorted sense of right and wrong.

I sometimes ask my clients the following question: “How many of you have ever felt angry enough at youer mother to get the urge to call her a bitch?” Typically half or more of the group members raise their hands. Then I ask, “How many of you have ever acted on that urge?” All the hands fly down, and the men cast appalled gazes on me, as if I had just asked whether they sell drugs outside elementary schools. So then I ask, “Well, why haven’t you?” The same answer shoots out from the men each time I do this exercise: “But you can’t treat your mother like that, no matter how angry you are! You just don’t do that!”

The unspoken remainder of this statement, which we can fill in for my clients, is: “But you can treat your wife or girlfriend like that, as long as you have a good enough reason. That’s different.” In other words, the abuser’s problem lies above all in his belief that controlling or abusing his female partner is justifiable….

— Lundy Bancroft, Why Does He Do That? Inside the Minds of Angry and Controlling Men (via seebster)  
reblogged: (via)
97,437 notes
April 12, 2014
almostpanicking:

momofficial:

all four

all of the Panic! at the Disco albums in order

almostpanicking:

momofficial:

all four

all of the Panic! at the Disco albums in order

(Source: alienemotions)

 
reblogged: (via)
46,756 notes
April 12, 2014
 
reblogged: (via)
691 notes
April 12, 2014
  • LA Times:
    OK, I'm going to use the topic of poet to transition into Rob Lowe. He got quite the attention with his comments that there's a prejudice against attractive people. What did you think of his comments?
  • Nick Offerman:
    Um, well, actually when that came out, I arranged for a 12-piece string quartet to speed over to his house and play an elaborate fugue. I didn't realize what a rough time he was having. I would've been giving him a piggyback ride to set if I knew that things were so tough.
reblogged: (via)
46,469 notes
April 10, 2014
gavindavidofree:

she keeps me warm

gavindavidofree:

she keeps me warm

(Source: kyousaya)